A letter which was written a day before the unfortunate Titanic disaster has been uncovered 105 years after the tragic accident. The letter was written by a victim stating ‘if all goes well we will arrive in New York on Wednesday’ is up for auction at a break record value of 119,000 Pounds (a little above Rs 1 crore). The letter was written by a wealthy first-class passenger which was initially valued at 80,000 Pounds (approximately Rs 70 lakhs). In the letter, Alexander Oskar Holverson has described the luxurious surroundings of the ship in over three pages. The letter comes along with a sad note written by his grieving mother, Rachael about her loss.

 
Artefacts from Titanic survivors to be auctioned online

Artefacts from Titanic survivors to be auctioned online

There is also a photograph of Holverson and his wife Mary which was taken in New York before they embarked on a trip to Europe. Dated April 13, 1912, his letter reads, “This boat is giant in size and fitted up like a palacial hotel. The food and music is excellent’. The letter also has reference to Titanic’s most famous and richest passenger, John Jacob Astor. Holverson in the letter also wrote how he sat on the deck with an American businessman who ‘looks like any other human being even tho he has millions of money’. He also mentions in the letter, “So far we have had very good weather. If all goes well we will arrive in New York on Wednesday A.M.”

Image: PhilYeomans/BNPS
Image: PhilYeomans/BNPS

Andrew Aldridge, of Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers, said the letter is the last known letter written on board by a victim. Aldridge said, “Since this one was recovered from Holverson’s body he obviously had hoped to send it on to his mother from New York. While the ink and wording has not run, the letter displays some colorful stains to the last page which was the page mostly exposed to the water evident from the way the letter had been folded by Holverson.
‘The stains give testament to the acid-rich paper with salt water.” A letter written on April 14, 1912, by passenger Esther Hart, who survived the sinking, sold for a record 119,000 British Pounds two years ago.