Washington: The International Monetary Fund on Tuesday projected India’s DGP growth and said the economy, which contracted by 7.3 per cent due to the COVID-19 pandemic, is expected to grow by 9.5 per cent in 2021 and 8.5 per cent in 2022.Also Read - International Flights: Air India Increases Flight Frequency Between Delhi, Chicago From Nov 3, Opens Booking

It must be noted that India’s growth projection released by the latest World Economic Outlook remains unchanged from its previous WEO (World Economic Outlook) update of July this summer but is a three-percentage point in 2021 and 1.6 percentage point drop from its April projections. Also Read - Ban on Sale, Use of Firecrackers: How These States Take Strict Measures to Bring Air Pollution Under Control

As per the latest WEO update, released ahead of the annual meeting of the IMF and the World Bank, the world is expected to grow at 5.9 per cent in 2021 and 4.9 per cent in 2022. Also Read - Karnataka Lockdown: Bommai Govt Makes Big Announcement, Plans to Relax Curbs For Commercial Establishments, May Open Borders

The United States is projected to grow at six per cent this year and 5.2 per cent the next year. China, on the other hand, the IMF said is projected to grow at 8 per cent in 2021 and 5.6 per cent in 2022.

Speaking to PTI, Gita Gopinath, Chief Economist of the IMF, said that compared to their July forecast, the global growth projection for 2021 has been revised down marginally to 5.9 per cent and is unchanged for 2022 at 4.9 per cent. However, this modest headline revision masks large downgrades for some countries.

“The outlook for the low-income developing country group has darkened considerably due to worsening pandemic dynamics. The downgrade also reflects more difficult near-term prospects for the advanced economy group, in part due to supply disruptions,” she said.

Observing that the dangerous divergence in economic prospects across countries remains a major concern, she said aggregate output for the advanced economy group is expected to regain its pre-pandemic trend path in 2022 and exceed it by 0.9 per cent in 2024.

“By contrast, aggregate output for the emerging market and developing economy group (excluding China) is expected to remain 5.5 per cent below the pre-pandemic forecast in 2024, resulting in a larger setback to improvements in their living standards,” she added.

Gopinath said that another urgent global priority is the need to slow the rise in global temperatures and contain the growing adverse effects of climate change. This will require more ambitious commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow.

(With inputs from PTI)