With Valentine’s Day just a day away, it isn’t hard to spot couples displaying their affection for each other. Every second post on Facebook is about how amazing is the feeling of being in ‘love’ and how they have the best partner in the world. Be it check-ins to luxurious holiday destinations, or a quick romantic getaway, couples turn up the volume of their love by several notches. An entire week is dedicated to V-Day celebrations, and Insta-Posts and Snap-Stories are full of the amazing gifts couples have exchanged, even as Hallmark laughs all the way to the bank! But, for all the couples who look down upon singles, and for all the singles who are looking for a valid reason to remain so – here is some amazing news: A new study has found that single people enjoy more mental, physical health benefits.

Starbucks' Valentine's Day Cherry Mocha Drink Crushes Libido; Could Lead to Poor Performance in Bed

Starbucks' Valentine's Day Cherry Mocha Drink Crushes Libido; Could Lead to Poor Performance in Bed

Remember Kangana Ranaut dancing chirpily to ‘Single Rehne De’ in her 2017 film Simran? The song became an overnight hit thanks to the groovy music, catchy lyrics and of course, Kangana. The lyrics of the song roughly translate to ‘eat, drink, take no tension and let everyone know that you lead a life full of happiness’. Interestingly, this seems like a prophecy of what some recent studies have concluded. Single people are more likely to not only embrace solitude, but also benefit from it, find recent studies. The Independent reports that marriage can constrain people socially, and is not always the happy ending we perceive it to be. A study published in 2015 in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships found that single individuals are more likely to frequently stay in touch with, provide help to, and receive help from parents, siblings, neighbours and friends than the married.

Single in 2017? 7 reasons why it is awesome!

Single in 2017? 7 reasons why it is awesome!

These findings are reiterated by Bella DePaulo, a psychologist at the University of California Santa Barbara. She not only advocates a single life, but also travels the nation to present these findings, which she says are too often dismissed by the larger psychology community. Bella called being ‘single’ her ‘happily ever after’. Being single essentially increases the social connections for both men and women. Two social scientists, Natalia Sarkisian and Naomi Gerstel, set out in 2015 to explore how ties to relatives, neighbours, and friends varied among single and married American adults. The duo found that single people were more likely to frequently reach out to their social networks. They also found that single people tend to provide and receive help from these people more than their married peers.

Being single or committed also has an impact on physical fitness. A survey of over 13,000 people between the ages 18 and 64 revealed that those who were single and had never married worked out more frequently each week than their married and divorced peers. Studies have linked solitude to benefits such as an increased sense of freedom and higher levels of creativity and intimacy. So the next time someone pities you for being single, you know what to tell them!