A video from The Guardian perhaps gives us the most amazing comeback there has been against the practise of revenge porn. The video tells the tale of a woman whose email and phone had been hacked and her naked pictures had been released on the internet. Unlike others, Emma Holten, a Danish journalist decided to fight back.

It all started in 2011, when someone hacked into her phone, she wrote for Hysterical Feminisms. Her pictures were released on the internet but what was shocking was the reaction from thousands of people who suddenly felt like they owned her. She received questions like ‘do you parents know you are a slut?’ or ‘did you get fired?’

Along with there were demands to send her more pictures, failing which, they would send the pictures to her boss. When she asked a site which had her naked pictures to take it down, they replied: ‘You shouldn’t have been such a whore.’ This wasn’t consensual sex anymore, but sexualisation against one’s wills, sexual assault in a virtual world!

Along with connecting the world, the World Wide Web has unleashed every man’s inner pervert. Not one to be cowed down, Emma Holten hit back by asking a photographer to take nude pictures. It wasn’t in her own words ‘counterintuitive but taking back her own rights’.

A similar situation occurred in India when the Times of India faced off against Deepika Padukone after she took umbrage to a picture which showed her bending down. TOI blatantly defended their case with the same twisted logic that just because Deepika was an actress who appeared in item numbers and did raunchy shoots they had to right to play Peeping Tom.  Like a Khap Panchayat, the leading English daily in the country also failed to realise the concept of consent.

Unlike other crimes, sexual assault somehow can never move past victim-blaming. Why was she drinking? Why did she take nude pictures of herself? Why did she wear those clothes? The same thing happened when celeb pics were leaked on the internet which was eerily titled The Fappenning. It wasn’t a violation of privacy but as Peggy Drexler wrote for CNN ‘it’s a flat-out criminal invasion.’ So every time you see a naked girl’s pic online, the chances are that it’s been put there without her consent. Trust me; you don’t want to be part of that!  You can read more about her project on Hysteria.