A total solar eclipse that occurred on July 2 caused a major hurricane in the Pacific Ocean. Weather satellites captured total eclipse and Hurricane Barbara in the Pacific Ocean in one shot. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)took to Twitter to share the natural phenomenon captured by Its GOES East and West satellites. In the picture, the moon’s shadow covers Chile and Argentina in temporary darkness and the hurricane can be seen raging in the ocean.

The Kansas City branch of the National Weather Service tweeted, “Not too often you catch a Category 4 hurricane and a solar eclipse occurring in the same satellite loop. (sic)”

Multiple satellites show the eclipse moving towards totality while the southern continent gets covered in darkness. The spectacular phenomenon GIF has now gone viral on social media that shows moon’s shadow passing through the globe as the Hurricane Barbara brew up in the Pacific Ocean.

Check it out here:

As per the Live Science report, the shadow reached the Chilean around 4:40 pm on Tuesday and kept going right, heading east towards Atlantic. However, the hurricane is far from the land and is expected to weaken this week.

During the total solar eclipse, the Moon moves between the Sun and the Earth which results in blocking the Sun’s rays and cast shadow on parts of the Earth and blocks the Sun completely. On the other hand, during a partial solar eclipse, the Sun, Moon and Earth are not completely lined and the Moon only covers the portion of the Sun and when viewed by from Earth, Sun appears as a disk.