DIY: How to repair a tubeless puncture Also Read - Mouni Roy Misses Her Sunday Outings Amid Coronavirus Lockdown, Shares Sultry Pictures in White Crop Top, Jeggings

What: Your tyres are the four round rubber things that your car rests on Also Read - People in Delhi Rush to Buy Diyas Ahead of 9 PM 9 Minutes Event



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Why: Because they need air in them to function well



When: When they run out of air

Skill level:  4. It gets easier the more punctures you repair, but you never really have enough to have regular practice. At least, we hope you don’t.

Equipment level: 5. You’ll need a puncture repair kit. A pair of pliers will come handy to pull out the thing that made the puncture, either a hand or electric pump will be needed to refill the air and a tyre pressure gauge will be needed if you’re particular about your air pressure. Some water will also be required. A tube and a blade are a bonus.

DIY: How to repair a tubeless puncture

DIY:

– You’ll have to couple this one with the How to change a wheel DIY  because you’re only going to repair a puncture when you don’t have a spare handy, and you’ll have to remove the wheel to repair the puncture

– Once you’ve got the wheel removed, you’ll have to determine the source of the leak.

DIY: How to repair a tubeless puncture

– Check the tyre visually for the source of the leak. Most punctures are caused by nails, stones or pieces of glass. Hopefully the puncturing device has embedded itself in the tyre.

– The most obvious place to look will be the crown of the tyre – the bit that comes in contact with the road. Look carefully in the grooves as well, if a nail goes all the way in up to its head it will be hard to spot it.

– If you find it hard to spot the culprit, fill the tyre up with air. If there’s a big hole, the air rushing out will hiss and make it easy for you to spot the leak. If not, pour water on the tyre. It will bubble at the place of leakage.

DIY: How to repair a tubeless puncture

– If there’s a nail or glass piece in the tyre, use the pair of pliers to pull it out. Insert the smoothening tool to make sure the hole is smooth enough to make an airtight pair with the plug. This enlarges the puncture in most cases, but that’s okay. You’ll have to push it in and out a few times to make sure it’s smooth. This is the hard part.

– Leave the smoothening tool in the tyre so that the air doesn’t escape and remove one plug from the set. Insert it through the eye of the plug insertion tool – halfway through is fine.

DIY: How to repair a tubeless puncture

– Remove the smoothening tool and insert the plug in the hole. When you pull the plug insertion tool out, the plug should ideally remain in the hole. If it doesn’t, you’ll have to repeat from the previous step onwards again. Some people use fast-acting glue to make sure the plug sticks in the tyre, but we aren’t sure if that’s a good idea.

– Use the blade to cut away any bits of the plug that are sticking out excessively.

– If you can find no punctures on the crown, look on the sidewalls for cuts.

– If you find any, pour water on them to see if they’re the culprits. If they are, then you’ve to resort to installing a tube in the tyre.  However, that isn’t something that you can do yourself, but do carry the tube along nevertheless. You never know when you’ll run into a ‘puncher repair’ shop.

– Don’t drive too long or hard on a tubeless tyre that has a tube in it, the combination heats up excessively.

– An alternative to this DIY is installing puncture sealants like Ride-On or Slime that seal the puncture and don’t allow any air to escape, saving you a lot of effort and time. 

– If you find any, pour water on them to see if they’re the culprits. If they are, then you’ve to resort to installing a tube in the tyre.  However, that isn’t something that you can do yourself, but do carry the tube along nevertheless. You never know when you’ll run into a ‘puncher repair’ shop.

– Don’t drive too long or hard on a tubeless tyre that has a tube in it, the combination heats up excessively.

– An alternative to this DIY is installing puncture sealants like Ride-On or Slime that seal the puncture and don’t allow any air to escape, saving you a lot of effort and time.