Actor Abhay Deol made a new post on Instagram after calling out Bollywood awards and mentioned his popular film Dev.D. The actor gave an insight into the making of the film and why he chose to spin a famous romantic story into a more contemporary telling. Abhay revealed that it was his idea to twist the ages-old Devdas story to show how the hero of the story is actually a big misogynist and the women more powerful than how they are perceived. Also Read - Abhay Deol Questions Hrithik Roshan's Nomination as Main Lead For Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara in a Thought-Provoking Post

Abhay said that only Anurag Kashyap trusted his vision and came on board to direct the film. The actor said he found it unfair to have women in the story expected to love the man despite all his follies and he changed that in his film. The character of Paro, played by Mahie Gill in Dev.D, reprimands Dev for his faults and Abhay said that’s because he wanted to show that a woman was no longer defined by the man she loves. A part of Abhay’s post on Instagram read, “I had read the book and I could see that the character was a chauvinist, a misogynist, entitled, and arrogant. Yet he had been romanticized for decades! The women on the other hand were strong and had integrity, but there was still that expectation for them to love their man no matter what. I wanted to change that. I wanted to empower them, shed the image of the “good, devoted, woman”. It was time to make them independent, not defined by the man they love, or by men in general. Which is why Paro calls out Dev’s faults and puts him in his place.” (sic) Also Read - Abhay Deol Wanted 'Benefits And Luxuries of Being a Deol', Anurag Kashyap Speaks on Actor's Downfall

Abhay also talked about the other woman in the film –  Chanda, played by Kalki Koechlin, and how she was shown totally unapologetic about the choice of her profession. The actor said he wanted to show a woman who is not ashamed of her life choices and Chanda was designed to prove the same. He wrote, “In my version Dev gets shot by the police (he becomes a drug dealer) outside Paro’s house and dies just like in the book. Chanda does not fall in love with him, and neither is she ashamed of being an East European high class escort (again, in my version 😊). She’s the strongest character of the 3, and isn’t afraid of being judged. She does empathize with Dev, seeing how broken he is, and I went with the “prostitute with the heart of gold” theme from the book.” (sic) Also Read - The Real Woke Hero! Abhay Deol Slams Indian Celebrities For Endorsing Fairness Creams While Supporting Anti-Racism Protests in America

Read Abhay’s full post here:

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“Dev.D” released in 2009. I spent a year narrating the idea to several people before I got Anurag on board to direct it. I remember people’s reaction upon hearing my narration, it was always, “it’s too much of an art-film”. Lucky for me Anurag got it. I had read the book and I could see that the character was a chauvinist, a misogynist, entitled, and arrogant. Yet he had been romanticized for decades! The women on the other hand were strong and had integrity, but there was still that expectation for them to love their man no matter what. I wanted to change that. I wanted to empower them, shed the image of the “good, devoted, woman”. It was time to make them independent, not defined by the man they love, or by men in general. Which is why Paro calls out Dev’s faults and puts him in his place. In my version Dev gets shot by the police (he becomes a drug dealer) outside Paro’s house and dies just like in the book. Chanda does not fall in love with him, and neither is she ashamed of being an East European high class escort (again, in my version 😊). She’s the strongest character of the 3, and isn’t afraid of being judged. She does empathize with Dev, seeing how broken he is, and I went with the “prostitute with the heart of gold” theme from the book. Anurag felt a happy ending would make the film more accepted by the audience, and his twist was to have Dev & Chanda fall in love. My vision was too dark! I went with the flow, and even brought my buddies @twilightplayers to feature in it. The rest is history. #makingwhatbollywouldnt #dev.d

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Dev.D was a distinct kind of cinema that was not just studded with some strong performances but also presented a new way of storytelling. The film questioned gender stereotypes and also showed women being aware of their sexuality. It still seems equally relevant and a totally entertaining watch!