Does your child often feel stressed and depressed? A walk in the woods is likely to improve his/her mood, researchers said. Also Read - Demand For Oxygen Supply Goes up Amid COVID Surge in Delhi, Govt Says Ramping Up Medical Infrastructure

The study, led by a team from the University of Hong Kong, revealed that children who developed a closer connection with nature had less distress, less hyperactivity and had a healthy lifestyle with regard to active play and eating habits. Also Read - IPL 2021 Points Table Latest Update After RR vs PBKS, Match 4: Punjab Kings Move to 3rd Spot After Beating Rajasthan Royals, Sanju Samson Pips KL Rahul to Take Orange Cap

They also had fewer behavioural and emotional difficulties, as well as improved pro-social behaviour. Also Read - IPL 2021, KKR vs MI Match 5 at MA Chidambaram Stadium: Weather Forecast, Pitch Report, Predicted Playing XIs, Head to Head, Toss Timing, Squads For Kolkata Knight Riders vs Mumbai Indians

However, despite the extensive, adjacent greenness, many families are not using these areas, the researchers rued in the paper published in the PLOS ONE journal.

“We noticed a tendency where parents are avoiding nature. They perceive it as dirty and dangerous, and their children unfortunately pick up these attitudes,” said Tanja Sobko from the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

In addition, the green areas are often unwelcoming with signs like “Keep off the grass”, Sobko added.

Recent research shows that spending time with nature may bring many health benefits, and many environmental programmes around the world are trying to decrease ‘nature-deficit’ and ‘child-nature disconnectedness’ in order to improve children’s health.

For the study, the team prepared a new 16-item parent questionnaire (CNI-PPC) to measure “connectedness to nature’ in very young children. The questionnaire identified four areas that reflect the child-nature relationship: enjoyment of nature, empathy for nature, responsibility towards nature and awareness of nature.

The results give a new possibility for investigating the link between the outdoor environment and well-being in pre-school children.

The team further plans to test the effect of exposing children to nature and changes in their gut microbiota.