Protein has always been associated with health benefits. But, did you ever think that a protein can also have negative impacts on your body and can cause age-related macular degeneration? Yes, you read it right. A high level of a protein called FHR4 in blood has been found to contribute to the development of age-related macular degeneration, which is one of the major causes behind blindness.

It is an eye disease that gradually gets worse and leads to permanent loss of vision in individuals above 60. AMD occurs when the central portion of your retina called macula wears off. Notably, the retina is positioned at the back of your eye and is called the light-sensitive nerve tissue. Age-related macular degeneration is characterised by less clear vision, dark or blurry areas in the center of your vision, or worse colour perception.

Certain factors including smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, and eating too much-saturated fat are known to increase your risk of developing macular degeneration. This debilitating condition can be prevented and your risk of being blind can be reduced significantly. Here is how:

Opt for green leafy vegetables

Being a rich source of strong antioxidants, green leafy vegetables including kale, spinach, and Swiss chard can neutralize the free radicals and protect you from cellular damage. Notably, free radicals can potentially cause inflammation and contribute to eye disease.

Maintain blood pressure

As mentioned above, hypertension can contribute to the onset of age-related macular degeneration by restricting the blood flow to the eyes. So, it is significant to keep your blood pressure maintained. You can do that by opting for some lifestyle changes. One of the best ways to control elevated blood pressure is by doing regular physical activity. Indulging in even 150 minutes of exercise a week can lower your blood pressure by around 5 to 8 mm Hg.

Wear sunglasses

UV rays and blue light are known to cause retinal damage and contribute to age-related macular degeneration. That is why the American Macular Degeneration Foundation suggests everyone to wear a pair with a UV 400 label.