Life can get better with age with mindfulness because older people have the wisdom and time to use mindfulness as a means to improve overall wellbeing, according to a new study. Also Read - SD vs DDC Dream11 Team Prediction Darwin T20 Cricket League 2020: Captain And Vice-captain, Fantasy Cricket Tips Southern Districts Cricket Club vs Darwin Cricket Club at Marrara Cricket Ground at 6AM IST

Mindfulness refers to the natural human ability to be aware of one’s experiences and to pay attention to the present moment in a purposeful, receptive, and non-judgmental way. Also Read - UP News: 21 Fresh Coronavirus Cases in Gautam Buddh Nagar, Total Tally at 591



Using mindful techniques can be instrumental in reducing stress and promoting positive psychological outcomes, the study said. Also Read - 'Govt Penalising Doctors', Delhi Medical Association Hits Out at CM Kejriwal For Warning Hospitals Over COVID-19 Crisis

According to the researchers, certain characteristics of mindfulness seem more strongly evident in older people compared to younger people – and suggest ways for all ages to benefit.



“This suggests that mindfulness may naturally develop with time and life experience,” said study co-author Tim Windsor from Flinders University in Australia.

The recent study, published in the journal Aging and Mental Health, based on an online community survey of 623 participants aged between 18 and 86 years.

“The significance of mindfulness for wellbeing may also increase as we get older, in particular the ability to focus on the present moment and to approach experiences in a non-judgmental way,” Windsor said.

“These characteristics are helpful in adapting to age-related challenges and in generating positive emotions,” Windsor added.

From middle age to old age, the survey highlights the tendency to focus on the present moment and adopt a non-judgmental orientation may become especially important for well-being with advancing age.

For the findings, the researchers assessed participants’ mindful qualities such as present-moment attention, acceptance, non-attachment and examined the relationships of these qualities with wellbeing more generally.

“The ability to appreciate the temporary nature of personal experiences may be particularly important for the way people manage their day-to-day goals across the second half of life,” said study lead author Leeann Mahlo.

The researchers found that positive relationships between aspects of mindfulness and wellbeing became stronger from middle age onwards.

“Our findings suggest that if mindfulness has particular benefits in later life, this could be translated into tailored training approaches to enhanced wellbeing in older populations,” she said.

Mindfulness skills can help build wellbeing at any age, the study said.