New Delhi: Soon after Rahul Gandhi asserted that ‘Sam Pitroda should be ashamed for his comment on the 1984 anti-Sikh riots’, Prime Minister Narendra Modi stepped up his attack on the Congress president for ‘pretending to reperimand’ his own ‘guru’ (mentor). “Naamdaar’, you pretended to scold your mentor for what? Because he publicly said what had always been in Congress’ heart? It’s you who should be ashamed,” said PM while addressing a rally in Bathinda, Punjab.

Upping the ante against the grand old party, Modi further stated,”Congress is struggling to win 50 seats because the Congress leader is confused and their thinking is diffused. The opposition party’s arrogance was at its peak.” (Catch Complete Coverage of Lok Sabha Elections 2019 Here)

Earlier in the day, while speaking at a poll rally  in Punjab’s Fatehgarh Sahib, Rahul had said,“Pitroda ji, what you had said was completely wrong and you should be ashamed of yourself. You should seek public apology. I am saying this publicly and I also said the same to him over phone.”

How the controversy started?

Pitroda, who is in charge of the Congress’s overseas affairs had stoked a controversy with his ‘hua toh hua’ (whatever happened, happened)” remarks on the 1984 anti-Sikh riots.

On being asked about BJP’s claim that instructions to kill in 1984 had come from late former PM Rajiv Gandhi, the senior Congress leader had said,“Ab kya hai ’84 ka? Aapne kya kiya 5 saal mein, uski baat kariye. ’84 mein hua to hua. Aapne kya kiya? (What about 1984 now?. What have you done in 5 years, talk about that. What happened in 1984, happened).”

 

The grand old party had distanced itself from Pitroda’s comments. Issuing a statement, the party had said, “We believe that justice should be done to 1984 riots victims as also to 2002 Gujarat riots victims. We abhor violence of any kind, against any person or a group of people based on their caste, colour, region or religion. This is the essence of India.”

Pitroda also apologised and said his comments were ‘blown out of proportion’. “The statement I made was completely twisted, taken out of context because my Hindi isn’t good, what I meant was ‘jo hua vo bura hua,’ I couldn’t translate ‘bura’ in my mind,” the senior Congress leader had said while speaking to media.
About the anti-Sikh riots

About 1984 Riots

About 2,800 Sikhs were killed across India, including 2,100 in Delhi, during the clash that broke out after then prime minister Indira Gandhi was assassinated by her Sikh bodyguards.

Of the 650 cases registered in connection with anti-Sikh riots in Delhi, 267 were closed as untraced by the Delhi Police.