While there’s nothing more relaxing than going on a cruise holiday, where you bask on the deck next to the pool with your favourite drink in hand; there’s a whole lot of planning that goes behind making it come true. However, the most important of them is to prepare yourself for unforeseen issues such as lost luggage or a twisted ankle – often with a simple step of purchasing a cruise insurance.

Cruise travel insurance can provide protection from risks that can otherwise run into thousands of bucks. However, a cruise insurance typically covers these three basic risks:

Loss of nonrefundable advance payments and deposits

Incase an unforeseen circumstance requires you to cancel your cruise, the Trip Cancellation Insurance component of cruise insurance repays you the amount you can’t recover from the cruise line; provided you cancel for a ‘covered’ reason. Also, some cruise lines have a ‘cancel for any reason’ clause that offers future cruise credit if you cancel your trip for a non-covered reason.

Extra costs of travelling home before your scheduled return

Suppose you (or a close family member at home) suffer an accident or illness during a cruise, a cruise insurance covers the extra costs of travelling home before your scheduled return. The Trip Interruption Insurance component of cruise insurance compensates for the extra airfare expenses and fees you pay to get home early.

Costs of emergency medical treatment

The cruise insurance also covers the costs of emergency medical treatment that is too severe to be treated by the cruise ship’s medical facilities. The Medical and Evacuation component of cruise insurance pays any such costs that isn’t covered by your regular health insurance.

Miscellaneous 

Most comprehensive cruise travel insurance policies also cover a handful of other problems such as lost luggage or delayed flights. You can buy cruise insurance directly from the cruise line, through a booking site, or from a third-party broker. If you cruise frequently, you can also consider an annual travel insurance, for a year-long period for a set premium.