Longwa is one of the biggest villages in the Mon district of Nagaland. And a very interesting one at that. It falls right on the international boundary line between India and Myanmar; getting the villagers dual citizenship of both the countries. Longwa is also home to the famous Konyak tribe. It is believed that the majority of the population of the tribe is in Myanmar today.

However, keep an eye out for the members of the Konyak in the region; they used to be head-hunters until the 1960s. The fierce lot have their face tattooed and continue to wear their traditional jewellery and headgear. The homes of these tribal people are decorated with elephant tusks, hornbill beaks, and human skulls to this date. The local tribe Konyaks had been collectors of enemy skulls; a way of showing that they have taken these heads during the battle. They also believed that having these skulls around boosted the  crop fertility. This village is also a prime zone to get opium in Nagaland.

Another interesting fact about Longwa is that the Indo-Myanmar border passes through the chief’s house, dividing it into two halves, one of which is in India and the other half in Myanmar. The chief is called an Angh, has 60 wives and rules more than 70 villages. The villagers don’t need a visa to move across the border and roam freely. Some families even have their kitchen in Myanmar and bedroom in India.

The highlight of Longwa however, is the abundant scenic beauty all around. You must take a trip to attractions like the Doyang River, Nagaland Science Centre, Hong Kong Market, Shilloi Lake and more.


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Photo by @talkinghelmet // There are about 16 major tribes in Nagaland. And like different states of India, these tribes are vary from each other, and used to be enemies in the past. Britishers explored into and identified these tribes as not only dangerous, also one of the BRAVEST, SMARTEST and the most BARBARIC species of people due to their raring culture of hunting heads of their enemies and decorating the village with it. And for administrative convenience they put them together as one single state and identity – Nagaland. With the British also of course came Christianity, which managed to convince these STAUNCH HEAD HUNTERS that Jesus is the only God; and God wants you to ‘love thy neighbor’. Whichever tribe I spoke to in Nagaland sung the heroic tales of their own warriors. But nobody forgot to speak of the great Konyak warriors along with it. Even though the now in-charge Indian govt banned head hunting in early 1950s, this particular tribe took their time to adapt to the socio-political cum cultural transition. LONGWA Village, of upper Konyak region shall complete it’s 50 years of Christianity and possibly the last case of Head Hunting in the year 2020. Mr. Telim Nyakto Konyak is the gentlest of people. He loves to dress up in his traditional attire (made from teeth, tusk, hair, feathers of animals hunted by himself in the past) and tell stories of his own father, the last living Head Hunter from this village. . . . . . #travelbloggers #travel #travelphotography #lonelyplanet #natgeotraveler #mytinyatlas #explorer #journey #forbestravelguide #vsco #photooftheday #createexplore #instagram #travelgram #bestplacestogo #passionpassport #instagram #earthpix #thebeautifuldestination #streetphotography #bbctravel #asia #india #nagaland #northeastindia

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The village now has better transport connectivity as The Border Roads Organisation (BRO) personnels have repaired the narrow uphill road pretty well for a smooth drive. Once you reach the village of Mon availing Nagaland State Transport Corporation buses, you can take rental cars from there to reach Longwa. The best time to visit is between the months of October and March, as that is when Longwa is at its best. The weather is really pleasant during those months and the Nagaland Tourism is also at its peak owing to many festivals and fairs.