New Delhi, May 25: Following the suspension of the Twitter account of Abhijeet over his sexist and offensive comments, all hell broke loose and ultra-nationalists made it personal and accused the micro-blogging site of curbing individual right to freedom of speech. Echoing on the same point, the singer, called Twitter ‘Anti-national, anti-Hindu and anti-PM Modi’ and then the nationalists, because they can, started abusing Twitter head of India Raheel Khursheed.

In all of this people started blaming Raheel exclusively for the suspension of the singer’s account and linked it to the Twitter India head’s Kashmir heritage. Well, although that shows the ugly face of these self-proclaimed nationalist trollers who consider all Kashmiri people as ‘anti-national’, it also shows their lack of knowledge when it comes to using of any social networking sites.

While it can be a tedious task to go through the safety rules and regulations by these social media platforms and easier to click on the “I accept’ button, but perhaps our people need to realise that freedom of speech is only valid until it encroaches the freedom of speech or any other fundamental right of another individual. Well, people are not aware of simple safety guidelines of mobile apps, how can we expect them to go through the Constitution of India.

Anyway, leaving apart all of this, we users must realise that their is a report button using which people can report posts which they think are offensive to individual or community or can cause hatred or lead to any sort of violence. After people reports such posts, the matter is handled by the social networking sites and if they deem it actually offensive or potentially harmful, they have the right to delete the post, warn the user who posted it or suspend the account. In that case singer Abhijeet’s account was a landmine of abuses and offensive content.

While he had a tendency to make every post against the government a personal insult, he had crossed the line many a times. There are two explanations why he was doing what he was doing. Perhaps he requires some form of mental counselling and rebuild the mental filter which people generally possess, or perhaps he seeks to get a profile under the BJP, a ticket for poll like his fellow Babul Supriyo who is now a minister of state under the BJP. But whatever his reason might be, Abhijeet left no stone unturned to offend as many critic of the Government as he could.

Then he called a JNU student a prostitute, a student who posted a news article that claimed that some BJP leaders were running a sex-scandal. Not only he called her a prostitute and made offensive references, a woman who defended the student was also abused by Abhijeet. He also said this is how a proud Indian man should talk.

Sexism, check. Harassment, Check. Patriarchal Propaganda, check.

And this is what led to his account’s suspension.

Regarding the whole incident, when India.com sought a statement from Twitter, a spokesperson from the micro-blogging site responded as follows:

“We do not comment on individual accounts but what we can say is that our rules are clear and we enforce them. We want people to feel safe expressing diverse opinions and beliefs, but we draw the line when it comes to behaviour that crosses the line into abuse, including behaviour designed to consciously harass, intimidate, or silence another person’s voice. Those that violate our policies may find their account temporarily locked and/or be subject to permanent suspension. We encourage anyone who spots someone engaging in abusive behavior to report the content in-app or file a report.”

The author sincerely hopes that this clears the air for most of us who deem Raheel Khursheed exclusively responsible for the account suspension. Because quite clearly, the Twitter head of India has a list of important task to complete than going through anyone’s account, and by the way, they have a team of experts to monitor such posts.

As for the suspension of ‘jihadist’ and ‘anti-national’ posts on Twitter and the allegation that such accounts are not blocked, kindly report them as soon as possible, and it will be looked into by the concerned authority following which necessary steps will be taken.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are personal opinions of the author. However, the official statement was a result of correspondence with Twitter. The facts and opinions appearing in the article do not reflect the views of India.com and the organisation does not assume any responsibility or liability for the same.