Dehradun: The Indian Army, on Saturday, distanced itself from the controversy surrounding the dagger insignia on Indian cricketer Mahendra Singh Dhoni’s gloves, saying it had nothing to do with it. Also Read - CSK vs KKR 2020, IPL Today Match Report: Ruturaj Gaikwad Fifty, Ravindra Jadeja Blitzkrieg Help Chennai Super Kings Clinch Thriller vs Kolkata Knight Riders, Send Mumbai Indians Into Playoffs

On May 5, Dhoni’s wicket-keeping gloves sported an insignia, during India’s first World cup game in England against South Africa, that had the “Balidan badge” of the parachute regiment’s special force. Also Read - CSK vs MI 2020, IPL Today Match Report: Ishan Kishan Stars After Trent Boult Show as Mumbai Indians Beat Chennai Super Kings to Take Top Spot

Talking to reporters after a passing-out parade at the Indian Military Academy here, GOC-in-C (South-Western Command) Lt Gen Cherish Matheson said that it was Dhoni’s personal decision to wear the Army insignia on his gloves and the Army had nothing to do with it. Also Read - IPL 2020 MATCH HIGHLIGHTS CSK vs MI Sharjah: Kishan, de Kock Star Mumbai Thrash Chennai by 10 Wickets

Meanwhile, Union Minister Smriti Irani backed Dhoni for sporting the insignia and posted ‘Balidan Badge’ from her Instagram account.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) alone could take a decision on the issue, he said. Being an honorary lieutenant colonel of the regiment, the insignia is embossed on Dhoni’s gloves.

Earlier, BCCI had sought permission from ICC, for Dhoni to wear the gloves with insignia which was turned down by the cricket governing body.

“The ICC has responded to the BCCI to confirm the logo displayed by MS Dhoni in the previous match is not permitted to be worn on his wicket-keeping gloves at the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2019,” the ICC said in a statement on Friday.

The ICC cited the regulation from its rule book that deals with the clothing, “No Logo shall be permitted to be displayed on Cricket Clothing or Cricket Equipment, other than a National Logo, a Commercial Logo, an Event Logo, a Manufacturer’s Logo, a Player’s Bat Logo, a Charity Logo or a Non-Commercial Logo as provided in these regulations.”

The ICC said players could wear logos of sponsors only.

(With PTI inputs)