New Delhi: The ongoing second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India may peak between May 11-15 with 33-35 lakh total ‘active’ cases and decline steeply by the end of May, according to a mathematical module devised by IIT scientists. In predicting that the active cases would go up by about 10 lakh by mid-May before sliding, scientists from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur and Hyderabad applied the Susceptible, Undetected, Tested (positive), and Removed Approach’ (SUTRA) model.Also Read - India Squad For South Africa: 5 Players Who Missed Out Narrowly | IND vs SA T20I Series 2022

The scientists also said Delhi, Haryana, Rajasthan and Telangana may see a high of new cases by April 25-30, while Maharashtra and Chhattisgarh might already have reached their peak in new cases. “We have found that there is a reasonable chance that the active cases in India could peak sometime between May 11-15 with 33-35 lakh cases. It is a sharp slope, but on the way down, it would likely be equally sharp, coming down very fast and by end of May may see a dramatic reduction,” Manindra Agrawal, professor at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, IIT-Kanpur, said. Also Read - Is India Heading Towards 4th Wave With Detection of BA.4, BA.5? Here's What Maharashtra Health Minister Predicts

The scientists in the as yet unpublished study said there are several novel features in the SUTRA model. Whereas previous papers divided the patient population into asymptomatic and Infected, the new model also accounts for the fact that some fraction of asymptomatic patients could also be detected due to contact tracing and other such protocols. Also Read - This Country Extends Work From Home Order As COVID Cases Continue to Rise, Strict Curbs Imposed | Key Points

“Earlier this month, the mathematical modelling approach predicted that active infections in the country would peak by April 15 but this didn’t come true. The parameters in our model for the current phase are continuously drifting. So it is hard to get their value right,” said Agrawal.

“Even a little bit of change each day causes the peak numbers to change by several thousand,” he explained. The IIT Kanpur professor added that the SUTRA model’s prediction of the new peak is sensitive to the daily new infections data.