New Delhi: A day after both the countries started withdrawing their armies from multiple locations at the LAC, India on Wednesday said China needs to retreat its 1000 troops from the rear positions in its territory along the Line of Actual Control. Also Read - Kartik Aaryan Quits Advertising Chinese Mobile Brand Oppo, Rejects His Multi-Crore Deal

The statement from India comes at a time when talks between both sides slated to start from Wednesday at the Major General-level and after the military commanders’ talks on June 6. Also Read - 'Disappointing And Saddening': Truecaller on Being in The List of 89 Apps Banned by Indian Army

On Tuesday, Indian and Chinese troops have disengaged at three locations including Galwan valley area (Patrolling Point 14), Patrolling Point 15 and Hot Springs (Patrolling Point 17) by 2-2.5 kms. Also Read - Namami Gange: World Bank Provides $400 Million to Rejuvenate Ganga River in India

“Disengagement has started in the eastern Ladakh sector but what we want is de-induction of more than a division size troops (10,000 plus troops) that have been deployed by the Chinese in the rear positions in its territory along the Line of Actual Control. Disengagement is fine but the tensions can be done away with only when the Chinese de-induct their heavy build-up which includes the deployment of more than a division size of troops along with heavy artillery, tanks and infantry combat vehicles,” top government sources told news agency ANI.

On the other hand, Beijing that Indian and Chinese troops have started implementing the positive consensus reached by the senior military officials of the two countries on June 6 aimed at “easing” the situation along the borders.

The Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson’s remarks came a day after officials in New Delhi suggested that armies of India and China have undertaken a “limited disengagement” in few areas in eastern Ladakh in a demonstration of their intent to end the border standoff peacefully ahead of another round of military talks on Wednesday.

Asked about the reports of the troops on both sides disengaging and moving back to their previous positions, Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying told a media briefing here that both sides are taking steps to ease the situation along the borders.

Indian and Chinese troops have been engaged since May 5 following a violent clash in Pangong Tso.

The trigger for the face-off was China’s stiff opposition to India laying a key road in the Finger area around the Pangong Tso Lake besides construction of another road connecting the Darbuk-Shayok-Daulat Beg Oldie road in Galwan Valley.

The armies of both the countries on Tuesday have undertaken a symbolic disengagement in a few areas in eastern Ladakh in a demonstration of their intent to end the border standoff peacefully ahead of another round of military talks on Wednesday.

However, there was no official word on the disengagement from the defence ministry, the ministry of external affairs or from the Chinese side.