Bengaluru, July 28: After Mahadayi Water Disputes Tribunal (MWDT) rejected Karnataka government’s plea for an interim order to allow the state to draw 7.56 tmcft of water from Mahadayi river to Malaprabha river, pro-Kannada organisations and the Kannada film industry called for a Karnataka bandh on July 30. The state which was paralysed for last three days due to strike of employees of state-owned KSRTC and BMTC. Also Read - Wait Over! Tesla Finally Enters India as it Registers Office in Bengaluru; Karnataka CM Tweets Welcome to Elon Musk

Kannada Chaluvali Vatal Paksha leader Vatal Nagaraj, who heads Kannada Okkoota, a forum of pro-Kannada organisations, requested people to co-operate in the complete shutdown in the Karnataka. Sa Ra Govindu, president, Karnataka Film Chamber of Commerce, also assured that Karnataka film industry will give its full support to make the bandh successful. (ALSO READ: Karnataka bandh: All you need to know about the Mahadayi water dispute) Also Read - List of States That Announced Reopening of Schools, Colleges This Month

What is the dispute? The dispute between Karnataka government and Goa government is over sharing of waters of the Mahadayi river (called Mandovi in Goa). The Mahadayi river originates and flows for 28 kilometer in Karnataka and goes through Maharashtra and Goa before meeting the Arabian Sea. Also Read - UK Flight to Land in Bengaluru at 4 am Tomorrow, Travellers to Undergo RT-PCR Test on Arrival

In order to to divert 7.56 tmcft of water to the Malaprabha river basin, Congress-led Karnataka government wants to build canals to link Kalasa and Banduri, the tributaries of Mahadayi. Objecting the move, BJP-led Goa government argued that if Karnataka implemented the Kalasa-Banduri project, it would prove disastrous for the ecologically sensitive Western Ghats as the proposed project was deep inside the forest.

Verdict: The Mahadayi tribunal headed by J N Panchal, has been hearing the petition filed by Goa against Maharashtra and Karnataka against the diversion of water. The tribunal concluded the hearing on July 25 and pronounced its judgment on July 27 ruling in favour of Goa government. The tribunal observed that allowing water to be transferred for the Kalasa-Banduri project would be ecologically damaging and upset the “natural equilibrium” of the river.