Hyderabad: The United States police on Thursday attached tracking devices on Indian students who were involved in the University of Farmington fiasco. The move was reportedly considered to be ‘grossly deplorable’ by the local attorneys and residents. The federal agents had allegedly tied the tracking devices to restrict the movement of the students and probe their immigration status, stated sources.

Legal consultant Phani Bobba from Atlanta told the Times of India, “A student reached out to me from Fremont, California saying that they tied a tracker around her ankle and instructed her to stay within a certain radius. She was given a map and asked not to cross the defined boundaries. They also gave her batteries to ensure that the device is charged.” Before this incident, yet another student from Telangana was detained by the US police for more than 14 hours.

Meanwhile, the Indian government has requested the US Department of Homeland Security to send a list of all the Indian students who were detained in the fiasco and a list of those who were involved in the process of recruiting and enrolling the students.

According to the Times of India report, the spokesperson of the Indian government said, “Our Mission and Posts are ready to render all assistance to Indian students in the US to deal with the emerging situation. We have also involved Indian community organisations in reaching out to the students. We are monitoring the situation closely and have impressed upon the US government the need to address the situation at the earliest.” Members of the Telugu Association of North America (TANA) deemed the move as ‘ridiculous’ and ‘grossly unjust’.

Similarly, in 2011, dozens of Indian students were detained in a ‘Tri-Valley University’ fiasco in Pleasanton, California. A massive outcry erupted at India as well as in the US after the move. In fact, the National Human Rights Commission had clearly stated the violation of students’ human rights to the external affairs ministry. The Indian authorities also demanded the removal of the radio tags.