London, Jun 30: Interior minister Theresa May vowed to unite Britain as she launched her bid to succeed David Cameron as prime minister with a letter to The Times, the newspaper has reported. The Conservative leader resigned in the wake of Britain’s vote to leave the European Union in a June 23 referendum that sent shockwaves through the continent. (Read: Vodafone says UK headquarters in doubt after Brexit)

Like Cameron, May supported remaining in the bloc but played a low-key and conciliatory role in the campaign that has seen her tipped as a unifying figure. In her letter to The Times, May announced a “mission to make Britain a country that works for everyone,” according to the broadsheet yesterday.

“If you’re from an ordinary, working-class family, life is just much harder than many people in politics realise,” May wrote. The appeal to working-class voters by the vicar’s daughter was aimed at her main rival for the leadership, the Latin-quoting former mayor of London and prominent “Leave” campaigner Boris Johnson, who projects a more upper-class image.

Cameron promoted May, 59, to Home Secretary following his 2010 election victory and she kept the role after his 2015 re-election. Known as a hardliner on immigration, May’s stern demeanour and wardrobe of sober suits have drawn comparisons with 1980s Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Cameron’s successor is expected to take office in early September.