New Delhi: Pakistan is working on erasing the digital footprint of the Pulwama terror attack. And it has the help of Chinese cyber experts to do so, intelligence sources said. (Also read: China Promises to Play Role in De-escalating Tension)

In an exclusive report, DNA said the efforts, called ‘digital mop of signatures’ in cybersecurity lingo, would help Pakistan rid itself of evidence that corroborates India’s stand that the February 14 attack was executed by Pakistan-based Jaishe-e-Mohammad, something that even JeM has claimed responsibility for.

“Pakistan is making all attempts with the help of friendly country (China) to remove digital signatures linked with the attack so that India cannot produce any concrete evidence against it,” said an Intelligence Bureau source to the daily.

Any digital activity, be it a phone call, net browsing, or an email, leaves traces even if it is deleted. Experts can track them and remove them for good.

India has said that it has evidence of Pakistan’s involvement in the suicide attack that left 40 CRPF personnel dead, though Pakistan continued to deny it. Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan even said, “Pakistan will take action on priority if there’s actionable intelligence.”

Sources said Pakistan has started permanently deleting digital data that could link JeM operatives in Kashmir with their handlers in Pakistani Army or ISI.

Meanwhile, India has taken the diplomatic route to isolate Pakistan and to get JeM Masood Azhar listed by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) as a global terrorist. A proposal in this regard has been submitted by the US, UK and France to the Council.

“Once the digital signatures are removed, Pakistan will try to claim that India has no evidence against Azhar that proves that he was is a terrorist,” said a source.

The DNA report had sources claiming that apart from apps like WhatsApp Messenger, JeM has its own mobile chatting application, an open source and end-to-end encrypted programme having a local server. This makes it difficult for Indian intelligence agencies the decode encrypted messages among JeM members.