Ranbir Kapoor starrer Sanjay Dutt biopic titled ‘Sanju’, which has already garnered a lot of curiosity among the moviegoers and fans, has hit the silver screen (on June 29) today. The film is not only an important film for Sanjay Dutt but also Ranbir Kapoor, who hasn’t tasted box office yet. Written and helmed by Rajkumar Hirani and bankrolled by Vinod Chopra Films and Rajkumar Hirani Films in association with Fox star studios, the film also stars an ensemble cast in addition to Ranbir Kapoor which includes Anushka Sharma, Paresh Rawal, Sonam Kapoor, Dia Mirza, Jim Sarbh, Karishma Tanna, Manisha Koirala, Vicky Kaushal and Boman Irani in pivotal roles. Sanju is highly-anticipated to bring some good business to Bollywood, let’s see what critics have to say about the film. ALSO READ: Sanjay Dutt Makes A Cameo In Ranbir Kapoor Starrer Sanju, Here’s Proof

Times Now (3.5/5): The first half of the film mainly focuses on his drug phase and his and his family’s battle with it. We get to see what went behind the scenes at that time. When Sanju (Ranbir Kapoor) starts narrating his story to Winnie, the biographer (Anushka Sharma), the initial bit felt forced and juvenile. The film, however, picks up the pace in the mid of the first half and the interval point will shock you! The second half of the film is better than the first as it focuses on his TADA and Arms Act case. The major problem of the film was the background score, in fact, it plays a spoilsport at various junctures throughout the film.

Times of India (4/5): The first half is extremely gripping and the second half is spent on elaborating on his court cases and the stress on the fact that he’s not a terrorist. That works out well in the movie and really helps create some great drama as the story of an earnest father and his reckless son plays out simultaneously. AR Rahman, Rohan-Rohan and Vikram Montrose’s music manages to create the period feel and set the right mood too. The background score is top notch too.

Hindustan Times (2.5/5): The film is not a hard look at Dutt’s controversial past and his tryst with the underworld. Only a fleeting reference of a local gangster has been made, that too with a lot of caution. Hirani mostly focuses on the events of Dutt’s life, beginning with his well-chronicled struggle with drugs. The director’s usual humorous style is evident from the first scene, and Ranbir Kapoor is probably his only tool to infuse intensity into Sanju. The only thing which seems out of place is his interpretation of the dark chapters of Dutt’s life. However, that doesn’t hamper the fluidity of the screenplay much.

NDTV (4/5): The 160-minute film, essentially a touching father-son drama that also pays tribute to some of Hindi cinema’s greatest lyricists, glides through its busy, pulsating narrative without suffering anything akin to an ungainly wobble. Kapoor shines bright. That is actually an understatement. He dazzles us; he catches us unawares, and he sweeps us off our feet. Sanju, as a result, is an entertainer that delivers more than just the superficial goods one expects from a mass entertainer. It sets a new benchmark for Bollywood biopics. It will be a hard act to follow.

Watch this space for further updates.