Spin legend Shane Warne has once again reignited his feud with former captain Steve Waugh as he publicly lashed out him, calling him ‘most selfish cricketer’ he ever played with. Warne rarely needed a second invitation to take aim at his former Australian teammate. A latest study from ESPNcricinfo statisticians revealed that Waugh was involved in more run-outs than any other player in the history of international cricket. Also Read - Australia Pacer Mitchell Starc Looking Forward to Pink Ball Test Against India

In his 493 international outings (Tests and ODIs both), the former Aussie skipper was a part of 104 run-outs throughout his 19-year career. Of Waugh’s 104 run-outs while he was at the crease, he was out 31 times while his batting partner walked back to the pavilion on 73 occasions – approximately 70% of the time. Reacting to the incredible stat, the world’s greatest legspinner – Warne took to his official Twitter handle to take another dig at Waugh saying: “For the record AGAIN & I’ve said this 1000 times – I do not hate S Waugh at all. FYI – I picked him in my all-time best Australian team recently.” Also Read - Dean Elgar Willing To Succeed Faf Du Plessis As South Africa’s Test Captain, Says Leadership Comes Naturally to Me




“Steve was easily the most selfish cricketer that I ever played with and this stat,” he added.

MOST PARTNERS RUN-OUT IN INTERNATIONAL CRICKET



Steve Waugh (AUS) – 73

Shivnarine Chanderpaul (WI) – 56

Sachin Tendulkar (IND) – 55

Tillakaratne Dilshan (SL) – 55

Aravinda de Silva (SL) – 51


Despite being a part of the dressing room in the dominant Australian team of the late 1990’s, Warne-Waugh shared a frosty relationship ever since the former was dropped from the Test XI during the West Indies tour in 1999.

In 2018, Warne recounted the incident in his autobiography ‘No Spin’ and mentioned in detail about his ‘disliking’ for his former captain.

“Disappointed is not a strong enough word,” Warne wrote.

“I lost a bit of respect for him after that. I believe he should have backed me – as I always believe the art of captaincy is to support your players and back them every time. This gains the respect from the players and makes them play for you. He didn’t, it’s history, but I never found it easy with him after that.”