Former Pakistan captain and one of cricket’s evergreen superstar – Shahid Afridi has finally ended the mystery around his age in his autobiography – ‘Game Changer’. Afridi’s age has long remained a point of debate among his fans and caused much amusement around the world. In his autobiography, Afridi revealed some never-shared-before details about his personal and cricketing life.

The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa-born cricketer was born in 1975 and not 1980 as the official records state. The revelations in his autobiography means that Afridi was not 16 when he smashed a record-breaking 37-ball hundred against Sri Lanka in Nairobi in 1996.


“I was just nineteen, and not sixteen like they claim. I was born in 1975. So yes, the authorities stated my age incorrectly,” Afridi has written in book titled ‘Game Changer’.

Afridi’s claim that was he was 19 at that time is confusing as he would be 21 if he was born in 1975 like he has written. He played 27 Tests, 398 ODIs and 99 T20 Internationals.

The former captain, who retired from international cricket after the 2016 World T20 , also slammed bowling great Waqar Younis in his book. Younis was the team’s coach in the 2016 World T20 held in India.

“Unfortunately, he hadn’t let go of the past. Waqar and I had a history, dating all the way back to his tiff with Wasim over the captaincy crown. He was a mediocre captain but a terrible coach, always micro-managing and getting in the way, trying to tell the captain – me – what to do… It was a natural clash and it was bound to happen,” he wrote.

Commenting on World Cup-winning captain and Pakistan Prime Minister – Imran Khan, Afridi heaped praise on his ideas for ‘Naya Pakistan’ and his efforts for peace with India.

“From his peace overtures (I quote his first speech, about Pakistan taking two steps towards peace if the Indians take one step – an approach I personally believe in too) to opening the Kartarpur corridor and releasing the Indian Air Force pilot shot down by the Pakistanis in February 2019 – peaceful relations with India are essential. Both countries, even the subcontinental region, will flourish,” the all-rounder writes in his book.

(With Agency Inputs)