universal child care benefit

Ottawa— The Harper Government will be introducing legislation in the coming days to enhance the Universal Child Care Benefit that, they say, will “put money back in the pockets of hard-working Canadian families.”

Under the proposed enhancements to the Universal Child Care Benefit, families would receive almost $2,000 per year for each child under 6 and $720 per year for each child aged 6 through 17. The new benefit amounts would be retroactive to January 1, 2015 and reflected in monthly payments to recipients in July 2015.
Pierre Poilievre, Minister of Employment and Social Development, and the Honourable Candice Bergen, Minister of State for Social Development, announced the changes this week.

Further changes announced include:

  • The Family Tax Cut: a non-refundable credit of up to $2,000 for couples with children under the age of 18, effective as of the 2014 tax year.
  • Doubling the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit: a tax credit that may be claimed by families whose children participated in an eligible program of physical activity. As of the 2014 taxation year, families may be able to claim up to $1,000 per child in eligible expenses, and the credit will be made refundable as of the 2015 taxation year, which will increase benefits to low-income families.
  • The Child Care Expenses Deduction: the maximum dollar limits that can be claimed will increase by $1,000 starting in the 2015 tax year—from $7,000 to $8,000 for children under 7; from $4,000 to $5,000 for children aged 7 through 16; and from $10,000 to $11,000 for children who are eligible for the Disability Tax Credit.

“Our Government is focused on helping Canadian families make ends meet by keeping more of their hard-earned money in their own pockets. If you’ve ‎got kids under 18, you qualify for the enhanced Universal Child Care Benefit. Period. It doesn’t matter how much you make or the type of child care you choose. That’s Canada’s low-tax plan for families,” said Poilievre.