William Shakespeare is one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He was a 16th century playwright, poet and actor who went on to write close to 40 plays, two long narrative poems and over a 100 sonnets that have through the centuries sold billions of copies and have been translated to thousands of languages. April 23 marks the 400th death anniversary of William Shakespeare. Incidentally so, it is believed that it also marks the death of famous Spanish writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, known for his two part novel, Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha. Over these 400 years, Shakespeare has become an epitome of classic literature and has made millions fall in love with his wordplay. And while a lot of his plays were set in countries like Italy, Spain, Greece, Turkey, Scotland and may more, some places in England are far more iconic to be missed. Here are some places around the world that every William Shakespeare fan must visit at least once! Also Read - How to Experiment With Colours in Your Style: Tips to Combine Unusual Colours in Your Outfit

1. Stratford-Upon-Avon

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons



Stratford-Upon-Avon is located in Warwickshire in England. This very house on the Hanley Street is where William Shakespeare was born. It is known that William was born on April 23, 1564 and passed away on his 52nd birthday in 1616. What was once a hamlet that merely co-existed with the rest of the world, has now become a world famous tourist destination. With over five million tourists flocking to Stratford each year, William Shakespeare left back wealth to his home town in a way that cannot be measured! Also Read - SSC Releases Revised Dates For Various Exams, Check New Schedule Here

2. Holy Trinity

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons



The Holy Trinity Church in Stratford has become yet another tourist attraction. It is believed that Shakespeare was baptised here within a few days of his birth. A few decades later, he was also buried here along with four other members of his family including his wife Anne Hathaway, their daughter Susanna, her husband John Hall and son-in-law Thomas Nash. Millions of travelers visit his grave which is believed to have a curse on the grave slab. The curse translates to–Good friend, for Jesus’ sake forbear, to dig the dust enclosed here. Blessed be the man that spares these stones, and cursed be he that moves my bones. It is also known that Shakespeare wanted this rhyme to be engraved on his grave slab in order to avoid being transferred to a charnel (A charnel is the place where bones of the deceased are placed to rest in peace after graves are emptied to make room for the ewer ones). Also Read - Romanian PM Pays $600 Fine After Pictures of Him Drinking & Smoking With Others Surfaces

3. The Globe Theatre

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

Photograph courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

At the young age of 18 years, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway who was eight years older than him. Soon after the wedding the couple had a baby girl and named her Susanna and then twins, Hamnet and Judith. It was only after having a family of his own that William Shakespeare wrote his first play, Henry VI Part One. Around this time, he left Stratford and traveled to London to to pursue theatre a lot more extensively. Through the late 16th century, London was hit by a massive plague and the theatres were shut. This is the time when Shakespeare took on to writing poems among other plots. Within a year in 1594, the theatres reopened, William formed his troupe and named it Chamberlain’s Men and went on to become regular performers for Queen Elizabeth I. The Globe was home to some of his masterpieces like Hamlet, Othello, Much Ado About Nothing, King Lear and many more.

4. Verona, Italy

Photograph courtesy: Andy Hay/Creative Commons

Photograph courtesy: Andy Hay/Creative Commons

This balcony in Verona is yet another iconic place one must visit. Though this home in Verona, Italy isn’t really connected to William Shakespeare’s life, it gradually became one of the most iconic landmarks in the country for lovers of both, literature and love itself. Romeo and Juliet’s houses have garnered a lot of public attention over the years in memory of by far the most romantic love story written in time immemorial.

 5. Royal Shakespeare Company

Photograph courtesy: rsc.org.uk

Photograph courtesy: rsc.org.uk

The Royal Shakespeare Company was also not directly connected to the life of Shakespeare. However, it is one of the places in England that promises to take you as close to what watching a Shakespearean play back in the 16th century as possible. If you’re up for watching a William Shakespeare play, you must watch it here!

>More stories on History and Heritage

Have something to add to this story? Post your comments in the discussion board below; we will be thrilled to hear from you!