Spread across the Kagoshima ad Miyazaki prefectures of Japan, the Kirishima-Kinkowan National Park is a combination of lush green forests, mountains and hot springs. The park and its inhabitants reside over an active volcanic region, with more than 20 volcanoes, crater lakes, waterfalls and valleys scattered across the area. The hot springs are another blessing, said to treat health conditions like anemia, liver problems and blood circulation issues. But let’s get specific and look at 5 things you definitely should see at the Kirishima-Kinkowan National Park in Japan. ALSO READ: Wisteria Flower Tunnel in Japan’s Kawachi Fuji Garden: Photos and Facts That’ll Tempt You to Visit Kitakyushu’s Biggest Attraction Also Read - Japan Lifts COVID-19 State of Emergency For 3 Prefectures

Mount Karakuni

Mt. Karakuni

Mt. Karakuni



The tallest of the mountains in Kirishima-Kinkowan is Mount Karakuni, rising up to an altitude of 1,700 meters. From here, you get an incredible panoramic view of the hilly terrain of the national park, as well as the Onami crater lake. Also Read - Gamer Grandma: Meet Hamako Mari, 90-Year-Old Japanese Woman With Guinness Record For Being Oldest Gaming YouTuber

Ebino Kogen

Kirishima Mountain Range, (c) JNTO

Kirishima Mountain Range, (c) JNTO



You also have a trekking trail that takes you through the Ebino Kogen highlands, with incredible views of three crater lakes along the way. Depending on the season in which you visit the park, you’ll be met by blooming flowers, lush green vegetation, or pristine white snow. Also Read - Japan Gives Nod to Rapid Antigen Kit to Detect COVID-19

Takachiho-no-mine

Onami-Ike Crater and Mt. Karakunidake (c) JNTO

Onami-Ike Crater and Mt. Karakunidake (c) JNTO

A big highlight of the Kirishima-Kinkowan park is the Takachiho-no-mine peak. This peak, while not the tallest, holds an important place in the mythology of the region. It is said to be the home of the deity Ninigi, the grandson of the sun goddess Amaterasu who descended down from heaven and began the Japanese imperial bloodline. The crimson red Kirishima Shrine houses the deity and lies at the foot of the mountain, and within 15 minutes by public bus from Maruo.

Kinko Bay

Mt. Sakurajima (c) JNTO

Mt. Sakurajima (c) JNTO

Next up is the Kinko Bay, said to have been formed around 29,000 years ago after a massive volcanic eruption. Here, you can still see the volcanic Mount Sakurajima spewing smoke. Meanwhile, life goes on as usual and the smoke of Sakurajima is as normal as seeing clouds in the sky.

Arimura Lava Observatory

Mt. Sakurajima (c) JNTO

Mt. Sakurajima (c) JNTO

And then you have the Arimura Lava Observatory, where you can experience volcanic landscape like nowhere else in Japan. Here, by the coast of Arimura, you can find natural hot water springs just bubbling water through sands. All you have to do is dig in and set your feet for your own personal hot bath for your feet. NOW READ: Photos of Osaka That Will Make You Want to Visit the Warm Port City

You can reach the Kirishima-Kinkowan national park from Osaka, Nagoya or Tokyo via bullet train; the destination station is JR Kagoshima-chuo. Plus, you have regular flights coming in at nearby Kagoshima Airport.

Photographs Courtesy: Japan National Tourism Organization