Mount Everest, Nepal

Mount Everest, Nepal

Mount Everest, which lies at an altitude of 8,848 meters above sea level, is the highest mountain in the world and a peak that anyone would want to conquer. But new rules by the Nepalese Tourism Ministry will make it difficult for certain climbers to fulfill their dream of summiting the mountain and standing at the top of the world. Under the new rules, solo climbers, blind people and double amputee climbers will not be permitted to scale Mount Everest. ALSO READ: The inspiring story of India’s first woman to climb Mount Everest four times Also Read - Want to Scale Mount Everest? Climbers Set to Face New Rules by Nepal Panel



The new rules have been put in place to prevent deaths on the highest mountain in the world, and come after a month of discussions. But this isn’t an outright ban. Individual, able climbers can make the ascent with the company of a Sherpa and other high-altitude guides who undertake expeditions to the summit. They can then stand to receive summit certificates. Meanwhile, an age limit on climbers that was proposed by Nepal alpine associations remains unimplemented. Associations had called for a maximum age of 76 years for climbers after an 85-year-old man died while making the climb in May 2017. Also Read - Mount Everest Death Toll Rises to 11; Mountaineers Asks Nepal to Limit Number of Permits

Meanwhile, concerns about climbers overcrowding the mountain continue to mountain. Experienced climbers have also raised issued about newer companies coming in and offering cheaper expeditions to the summit, but with lower safety standards. The tighter rules and bans by the government come before the spring climbing season begins, as is the norm. But enforcement of these rules remains much to be desired. NOW READ: Festivals and Events in India in January 2018 to Kick off a Year of Travel
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As for climbers with disabilities, 29 have attempted a climb according to the tourism ministry’s database, with 15 making it to the top. However, two famous climbers, Phur Yemba Sherpa and Thomas Weber, died in their attempts to climb the mountain. Many others have gone missing or come back injured. Climber Alan Arnette, however, called the ban irrational and ignorant.