Skygazers who missed out on January’s Super Blue Blood Moon, the first lunar eclipse of 2018, have a good chance of witnessing the next celestial wonder as the eclipse will adorn the skies next month. In the month of July, the world will witness a rare astronomical spectacle as a blood moon. The second of the year will appear on the intermediary night of July 27-28, as per reports. Also Read - Blood Moon 2018: Twitterati Poke Fun at Those Thinking Lunar Eclipse Means The End of The World, Share Spectacular Photos

The total lunar eclipse will follow the super blue blood moon of January 31, which too was a once-in-a-lifetime event when a supermoon, lunar eclipse and blue moon combine together at the same time. July’s Blood Moon will last nearly one hour and 43 minutes, and is being touted as the longest of this century. This rare astronomical spectacle will be nearly 40 minutes longer than the January 31 Super Blue Blood Moon. The January eclipse’s duration was of 77 minutes when the Moon’s lower limb appeared much brighter than the dark upper limb. Also Read - Total Lunar Eclipse on July 27-28, 2018: How And When to Watch The Rare Occurrence From Your City



Super Blue Blood Moon 2018: When, Where And How to Watch Live Streaming of Lunar Eclipse, Supermoon, Blue Moon at The Same Time in India

Super Blue Blood Moon 2018: When, Where And How to Watch Live Streaming of Lunar Eclipse, Supermoon, Blue Moon at The Same Time in India

The blood moon, also known as the ‘full buck moon’ is used to refer to the red tinge on a fully eclipsed Moon. It will turn blood red during the eclipse due to the way light bends around Earth’s atmosphere. During a blood moon, the moon turns from a deep red to orange colour rather than completely disappearing when it passes through the shadow cast by Earth. This bizarre phenomenon is known as ‘Rayleigh scattering’ filters out bands of green and violet light in the atmosphere during an eclipse. Also Read - Blood Moon 2018: Countdown Begins to Longest-Ever Lunar Eclipse



The blood moon will be visible only in the eastern hemisphere of the world – Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. However, people in North America and Arctic-Pacific region won’t be able to get a hold of this event this time. In Asia, Australia and Indonesia, the greatest view of the eclipse will be during morning hours. Europe and Africa will witness the eclipse during the evening hours, sometime between sunset and midnight on July 27, according to the reports.

Meanwhile, the January 31 sighting of a Super Blue Blood Moon and a total lunar eclipse occurred in India for the first time after 1982.