The Louvre Abu Dhabi opened to the public on Saturday showcasing hundreds of works. After a decade-long wait, the iconic museum is now expecting to gain visitors from around the world. Visitors to the museum which has artworks from both the East and West said that they were quite impressed by it. Many explained that the building itself was a huge attraction. In a bid to attract tourists, an amount of over USD 1 billion has been invested in the museum. Designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, Louvre museum has a honeycombed dome of eight layers of Arab-style geometric shapes. Also Read - Hindu Temple in Abu Dhabi Holds Online 'Satsangs' As Religious Services Remain Suspended Due to Coronavirus

 
New York architects plan skyscraper hanging from an asteroid! (See pictures)

New York architects plan skyscraper hanging from an asteroid! (See pictures)

While the nude artworks cannot be spotted inside it keeping in par the country’s conservative rules, the museum encompasses artworks on a brief history of the world, major religions, and also talks about Judaism. The building of the museum draws the lapping waters of the Persian Gulf into its outer corridors, showcasing individual beams of light pass through the roof to strike the surface. The entry to the museum costs 60 dirhams (INR 1,000). On an opening day, all 5,000 tickets sold out. Also Read - Sajal Ali-Ahad Raza Mir Break The Internet With Their Fairytale Wedding Pictures From Abu Dhabi

Take a look into the museum:

The grand opening

The Abu Dhabi museum was set up under a 2007 inter-governmental agreement between Paris and Abu Dhabi. They have partnered with museums and cultural institutions to lend them 28 significant works. Two more museums, Guggenheim Abu Dhabi and Zayed National Museum, are planned around the Louvre Abu Dhabi in the Saadiyat Cultural District. Those two buildings already host art fairs, exhibitions, and performances. The museum was initially slated to open in 2012, but the global financial crisis and some other issues lead to a further five-year delay in its completion.