New York: As agitations intensified across the US on Saturday over the murder of George Floyd, Black artist Jammie Holmes unveiled a powerful piece of protest art to honour the African -American man. Also Read - Hypocrite Much? Twitterati Slams Indians Who Are Protesting George Floyd's Murder But Remain Silent on Violence at Home

Taking the help of Detroit gallery Library Street Collective, Holmes commissioned planes to fly over five U.S. cities, carrying banners emblazoned with the last words spoken by Floyd, who was killed on May 25th while being arrested by Minneapolis police.

Banners reading ‘Please, I can’t breathe’, ‘My stomach hurts,’My neck hurts’, ‘Everything hurts,’ ‘They’re going to kill me,’ were flown across the skies of Detroit, Miami, Dallas, Los Angeles, and New York to condemn racism and police brutality.

View this post on Instagram

In response to the recent murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police, I initiated a public demonstration that extended across 5 cities on Saturday, May 30 between the hours of 11:30 AM and 9 PM EST. Airplanes with banners presenting Floyd’s final words connected these places across the United States to support Minneapolis in a national protest against police brutality within the African American community.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ DETROIT: PLEASE I CAN’T BREATHE. ⁠⠀ MIAMI: MY STOMACH HURTS. ⁠⠀ DALLAS: MY NECK HURTS. ⁠⠀ LOS ANGELES: EVERYTHING HURTS. ⁠⠀ NEW YORK: THEY’RE GOING TO KILL ME.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ This presentation is an act of social conscience and protest meant to bring people together in their shared incense at the inhumane treatment of American citizens. The deployment of Floyd’s last words in parts of its whole across the country underlines a need for unity and the conviction that what happened to George Floyd is happening all over America.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Like countless silenced and fearful young black men, I have been the victim of police misconduct on a number of occasions in my life. At some point, they will realize they can’t kill us all.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ Thank you to my gallery, Library Street Collective, for their generous support.⁠⠀ ⁠⠀ #BlackLivesMatter #JusticeForGeorgeFloyd #JammieHolmes #JHolmes @LibraryStreetCollective #LibraryStreetCollective⁠⠀ Photos by @hayden__scott, Andre De Aguilar, Mark LaBoyteaux, @ItsSlickRick, @suekwon_

A post shared by Jammie Holmes (@jholmes214) on

”This presentation is an act of social conscience and protest meant to bring people together in their shared incense at the inhumane treatment of American citizens. The deployment of Floyd’s last words in parts of its whole across the country underlines a need for unity and the conviction that what happened to George Floyd is happening all over America. An enduring culture of fear and hateful discrimination has only increased in its intensity since 2018, and a critical mass will no longer allow it to be ignored,” Holmes wrote on his website. 

He added: “Like countless silenced and fearful young black men, I have been the victim of police misconduct on a number of occasions in my life. At some point, they will realise they can’t kill us all.”

Holmes is a self-taught painter from Louisiana who is represented by Library Street Collective, a contemporary art gallery based in Detroit, as per WDET.  His art mostly depicts the everyday lives of black communities in the American South.

Meanwhile, all four officers involved in the incident have been fired from the Minneapolis Police Department, while Derek Chauvinm who was seen kneeling on Floyd’s neck now faces charges of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.