It all started when Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai praised teen environment activist Greta Thunberg for continuing her legacy of activism and the next thing we know is that the two were fangirling over each other at Oxford in the UK. Greta and Malala’s admiration for each other, as evident from their social media posts, left one believing that young women activists are future. Also Read - Pakistan Increases Testing Capability as Coronavirus Cases Rise to Nearly 1,900

Recently, in an interview with Teen Vogue, 22-year-old Malala had gushed about Greta and gun violence survivor Emma Gonzalez who is also a founder of the March For Our Lives movement. Malala was quoted saying, “Sometimes in rooms with decision-makers, they don’t have any young people at the table; they don’t even have women, let alone young people. So just to have the voices of young people present there, just to have women being present at those tables, I think it’s a huge difference.” Also Read - China Building Makeshift Hospital For Pakistan to Treat Coronavirus Patients



Currently in UK for a school strike slated for later this week, Greta met Malala who is a senior at Oxford. Spilling out her uncontained excitement, Greta shared a picture with Malala and captioned it, “So… today I met my role model. What else can I say? @malala (sic).” Malala quipped, “She’s the only friend I’d skip school for.” It is interesting to note that both the 17-year-old Swedish activist and Malala are Nobel Prize winners who had never met before but bonded like fast friends to no one’s surprise. Also Read - After 7 Days, Prince Charles Recovers From COVID-19, Out of Self-isolation Now

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So… today I met my role model. What else can I say? @malala

A post shared by Greta Thunberg (@gretathunberg) on



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Thank you, @gretathunberg. ❤️

A post shared by Malala (@malala) on

Honouring Greta Thunberg for her efforts to raise awareness about climate change, scientists recently named a newly discovered species of a land snail after the teen activist. The temperature-sensitive critter, which was discovered in Brunei on the island of Borneo, now has the scientific name Craspedotropis gretathunbergae.

Citizen scientist J.P. Lim, who discovered the snail, said that “naming this snail after Greta Thunberg is our way of acknowledging that her generation will be responsible for fixing problems that they did not create. And it’s a promise that people from all generations will join her to help.”

As for Nobel Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai, the activist was honoured by Harvard University in 2018 for her global work promoting girls’ education. Malala was shot in the head at point-blank range by Taliban gunmen in October 2012, while returning from her school in Pakistan’s Swat valley. In 2014, Malala became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her efforts for children’s rights. Later in 2018, Harvard credited her global movement to equip girls with 12 years of free, quality and safe education.

Young girls and boys often take several leaves of “fearlessness” out of Malala and Greta’s book. Their stories of courage and resistance are all the Wednesday motivation we need to take us through the rest of the week!