A Japanese space entertainment startup is preparing to start the world’s first artificial meteor shower in 2019. The company’s plan is to make fake meteors in the skies of Setouchi region of the Hiroshima Prefecture. The founder of Astro Live Experience and Chief Executive Officer, Lena Okajima, officially announced the Shooting Star Challenge, the company’s first trial run which will take place in 2019. The entertainment company will use a purpose-built satellite to showcases the display of shooting stars. Also Read - Yoshihide Suga Elected Japan’s New Prime Minister Succeeding Shinzo Abe, PM Modi Congratulates Him

Meteor as Bright as Moon Explodes Over Birmingham (Watch Video)

Meteor as Bright as Moon Explodes Over Birmingham (Watch Video)

ALE claims it can produce shooting starts anywhere, anytime. By releasing pellets from satellite they can the meteor can burst into flames in any color they enter the Earth’s atmosphere. These pellets can last longer and burn brighter from between five and ten seconds each. It will visible for 100 kilometres in every direction. According to the company’s claims, each shooting star will be as bright as Sirius, the brightest star in the Earth’s night sky. The team is now exploring the possibility of having multiple coloured meteors. Places with clear skies have been chosen as the location for the trail one, while stunning places can also make it to the list. Also Read - Japan PM Shinzo Abe, His Cabinet to Resign Today Paving Way For New Leadership

ALE can make the shooting stars much brighter and last longer than the natural phenomenon as they are artificial. Also, customers can opt to change the color of the meteor shower. ALE is getting support from educational facilities such as Tohoku University and Tokyo Metropolitan University, and financial care from corporates like FamilyMart and JAL. Researchers at the Kanagawa Institute and the Nihon University will also look into analysis for the mission. While shooting stars are known for their magical reputation they are just pieces of space debris from millimetres to a few centimetres thick which fly into Earth’s atmosphere and brightly burn up into nothing. Also Read - Yoshihide Suga Elected as Shinzo Abe's Successor, Set to Become Japan's Next Prime Minister